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Hear May May's Poem

Add Your Story

Complete the following form to add a new entry to our collection. The digital book will be updated daily. Check back often to see your story as well as the stories of others.

Note: In the event your story requires punctuation, please add your punctuation into the appropriate word box(es) along with the corresponding individual word.

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Tips and Idea Starters

Need a jump start…here are a few examples of Six-Word Stories

The most famous example of a six-word story is frequently credited to Ernest Hemingway (though there’s little evidence that he actually wrote it): “For sale: baby shoes. Never worn.” In six simple words, a heartbreaking narrative is told—from the few words but also from what is left out. Here are other short stories in this format:

  • Do something that is worth doing.
  • I dance daily, watched or not!
  • Dark places have room for light.
  • In a galaxy far, far away….

Six-Word Stories at the best…tips for an impactful story

Six words can make a compelling narrative when pulled from the heart. The shortened format should provide some movement of conflict, action, and resolution that gives the sense of a complete story and allow the reader to fill in the rest. Here are a few tips to help get you going…

  1. Storyline: Although 6-word stories are short, they still follow the same general rules as traditional narratives. This means they have a beginning, middle, and end. More particularly, they a movement of conflict, action, and resolution conveyed with vivid words.
  2. Small narrative arc: The key to writing your own six-word story is to take an original idea, filter out most of the words, and leave the most informative ones in, to tell a whole story.
  3. Write your own story: Find inspiration in your own life and challenge yourself to write you own story and then boil it down to six words that carefully sum up your experience and convey your emotions.
  4. Find your punchline: Your punchline is the “a-ha” moment. It’s that “oh, now I get it” realization that all six-word stories have in common. This is when there is a real turning point in the narrative. You can think of this as a plot twist, moment of emotional realization, or anything that makes sense to you.
  5. Entice the reader to fill in the blanks: In just six little words, you can create a powerful story that evokes emotions. Use what’s left on the cutting room floor to draw the reader in even further. Part of your story will be in what’s left unsaid.
  6. Choose your words carefully. With only six slots to fill, you don’t have room to waste with weak word choice. Choose words that have purpose and meaning and drive your story forward. Shorten phrases with contractions to make room for nouns and verbs. Use punctuation marks, colons, and dashes, to join different phrases without having to use conjunctions.